Previous Courses

2014 – 2015 Courses

Annie Rogers, PhD

The Clinic of Child Psychoanalysis

October 24-26, 2014

Fridays@CCP
The Analyst’s Act and the Child’s Desire
October 24, 2014, 7-9pm

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Candidate Seminar: The Clinic of Child Psychoanalysis
Saturday, October 25, 9-1 and 2:30-4:30
Sunday, October 26, 9-1

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Annie G. Rogers, PhD, is Professor of Psychoanalysis and Clinical Psychology at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, Analyst Member of the Lacanian School of Psychoanalysis in San Francisco and Member of the College of Psychoanalysts in Ireland. She is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship in Ireland, a Radcliffe Fellowship at Harvard University, and a Whiting Fellowship at Hampshire College. She is the author of A Shining Affliction (Penguin Viking, 1995) and The Unsayable: The Hidden Language of Trauma (Random House, 2006), as well as many academic articles, memoir, short fiction and poetry.  As Erikson Scholar at Austin-Riggs (Fall 2014), she is investigating language in psychosis and completing a collection of poems.

Seminar Description: How does Freudian/ Lacanian psychoanalysis conceptualize and direct the treatment of children and adolescents? What does an analyst actually do in sessions and with what results?  These are the major questions we’ll address in this seminar. Among approaches to treating children and adolescents the Lacanian field of psychoanalysis is unique. We will discuss Freud’s Little Hans case as a founding document, then explore two contemporary accounts of child treatment in a Lacanian psychoanalytic tradition: the “Ellen case” from my book, The Unsayable, and ‘Margot and the Magic Skin Eruptions” from Catherine Mathelin’s Lacanian Psychotherapy with Children:The Broken Piano. We will also work with one of my unpublished child cases in detail in order to decipher what is working in a childs history and symptom.

Alan Bass, PhD

The Work and Play of the Psychoanalyst

January 16-18, 2015

Fridays@CCP
The Work and Play of the Psychoanalyst
January 16, 7-9pm

Candidate Seminar: The Work and Play of the Psychoanalyst
Saturday, January 17, 9-1 and 2:30-4:30
Sunday, January 18, 9-1

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Alan Bass, PhD, is a practicing analyst in New York City.  A member of the IPA, he is training analyst and faculty for IPTAR and the Contemporary Freudian Society.  He also teaches in the graduate philosophy department of The New School for Social Research.  He is the author of two books, Difference and Disavowal: The Trauma of Eros and Interpretation and Difference: The Strangeness of Care, many articles, and the translator of four books by Jacques Derrida.

Seminar Description: Concrete patients characteristically enter analysis and then resist the analytic process, especially interpretation. The aim of the seminar is to explain their complex psychodynamics, and then to demonstrate a method to treat them. This method requires a rethinking of interpretation itself.

Elizabeth Rottenberg, PhD

Philosophical Themes in Psychoanalysis

February 16, 2015/ March 2, 2015/ April 20 & 27, 2015/ May 18, 2015/ June 1, 2015, Mondays, 7-9pm, Location TBA

Seminar open to CCP Candidates, CCP Graduates, CCP Board Members

Elizabeth Rottenberg, PhD, teaches philosophy at DePaul University and is a practicing psychoanalyst in Chicago. She is one of six founding members of the Derrida Seminars Translation Project and the translator most recently of Jacques Derrida’s The Death Penalty, Volume II. She is the author of Inheriting the Future: Legacies of Kant, Freud, and Flaubert (Stanford, 2005) and the translator of many books by Blanchot, Derrida, Lyotard. She is the editor of Negotiations: Interventions and Interviews (1971-2001) by Jacques Derrida (Stanford, 2001) as well as the co-editor (with Peggy Kamuf) of the two- volume edition of Jacques Derrida’s Psyche: Inventions of the Other (Stanford, 2007/2008). Her forthcoming book is entitled For the Love of Psychoanalysis.

Seminar Description: Is there such a thing as an accident in psychoanalysis or does everything have psychical meaning? This seminar will begin by showing that there was always, from the very beginning, a radical thinking of the accident in Freud. We will begin with early Freud and his thinking of the accident in the late 1890’s looking not at the erogenous body but at the traumatized body. We will turn, then, to Beyond the Pleasure Principle, where, in the wake of World War I, we get fully developed thinking of the accident (if we have time, we might even look at some 1915 texts on the war neuroses). We will look at how the notion of Nachträglichkeit (après coup, belatedness, deferred action, “afterwardsness”) is taken up by contemporary French psychoanalytic theory, on the one hand (Lacan, Laplanche), and by continental philosophy on the other (Butler, Deleuze and Guattari, Derrida… and why, for example, someone like Catherine Malabou avoids it in her thinking of the “traumatic event”). We will also spend some time on the anti-psychiatry movement in order to understand Michel Foucault’s interesting but symptomatic disavowal of Freud and psychoanalysis throughout his work.

Adrienne Harris, PhD

Transference and Countertransference in the light of Field Theory as models of Intersubjectivity

February 21-23, 2015

Fridays@CCP
Ghosts in the 21st Century Consulting Room
February 21, 2015, 7-9pm

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Candidate Seminar: Transference and Countertransference in the light of Field Theory as models of Intersubjectivity
Saturday, February 22, 9-1 and 2:30-4:30
Sunday, February 23, 9-1

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Adrienne Harris, PhD, is Faculty and Supervisor at New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. She is on the faculty and is a supervisor at the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California. She is a member and Training Analyst in the IPA. She is an Editor at Psychoanalytic Dialogues and Studies In Gender and Sexuality. In 2009, she, Lewis Aron, and Jeremy Safron established the Sandor Ferenczi Center at the New School University. Dr. Harris has written on topics in gender and development, analytic subjectivity and self-care, primitive states and the analytic community in the shadow of the First World War. Her current work is on analytic subjectivity and on ghosts. She and Lew Aron co-edit the Book Series Relational Perspectives in Psychoanalysis, now with over 50 published volumes.

Seminar description: This seminar will follow a series of topics related broadly to transference and countertransference phenomena.What changes and what evolves in taking a field theory perspective on the clinical situation?Topics to be covered:Bipersonal unconscious communicationImplications for thinking of the frame and the setting as integral aspects of analyst/analysand interaction

Subjectivity of the analyst: self-care, ruptures, boundary violations.

Clinical material will be presented and participants are encouraged to bring their own clinical vignettes.

Françoise Davoine, PhD & Jean-Max Gaudillière

Title TBA

CCP is sad to inform you that due to illness, our much-anticipated Fridays@CCP speakers, Françoise Davoine, PhD & Jean-Max Gaudillière will not be able to present to our group on 13 March as planned.

Malka Hirsch-Napchan, PhD

A conversation with the audience: the psychoanalytic journey: what is it? How to think of it

May 9, 10 and May 15, 2015

Fridays@CCP
A conversation with the audience: the psychoanalytic journey: what is it? How to think of it
May 15, 2015, 7-9pm

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Candidate Seminar: A conversation with the audience: the psychoanalytic journey: what is it? How to think of it
Saturday, May 9, 9-1 and 2:30-4:30
Sunday, May 10, 9-1

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Malka Hirsch-Napchan, PhD, is a Clinical Psychologist and Psychoanalyst and member of the British Psychoanalytic Society. She has teaching and supervision experiences in London, Israel, and Russia. She works in the public sector and in private practice.

Seminar Description: In this series of seminars we will attempt to explore Bions contribution to psychoanalytic theory and practice through the study of two of his papers Differentiation of the psychotic from the non-psychotic personalities (1957), and A theory of thinking (1962). Bion uses Kleins concept of projective identification as an object relation and as a defence mechanism, and he shows us a theory of object relations at the root of thinking. He affirms that we are born with a preconception of the breast; the breast he refers to is concretely mothers breast, and also a basic and abstract concept. When the real mother responds to the childs preconception, then the conception of the breast is constituted. The conception of the breast is thus reached when the real experience, the realization of the breast, is joined to the a priori preconception of it. What happens when the breast is absent, asks Bion? The baby does not feel that the breast is absent! It experiences that there is a bad breast inside, a bad breast that is present and that he wants to expel. When the breast does come to him, the baby feels that from the outside he has been helped to expel the bad breast. In the face of the frustration and the absence of the breast, the baby faces a dilemma: to expel and deny, or acknowledge it and modify it. Bion calls thought the attempt to modify frustration: ‘Sooner or later the wanted breast is felt as an idea of a breast missing. This is a developmental leap. In studying the functioning of the personality and this development of the mind, Bion emphasizes the relationship between container and contained. He differentiates between a positive form and a negative form of the container-contained relation. The positive form is necessary for mental growth: the contained has to find a container that receives and is able to modify. The child projects his fears into the mother, and the mother receives and assimilates and gives back to the child more tolerable contents (the contained) through her voice, her milk, her warmth, her mind. This is the essence of maternal reverie and is also what he later calls alpha function.The psychotic part of the personality makes destructive attacks upon everything it feels has the function of joining one object with another. Bion holds that the prototypes of any link are the breast and the penis, and the parental couple and the link between them, which suffer the violent sadism of the baby in the first months of life, as Melanie Klein postulated already in her early papers. Bion argues that when a triad formed by arrogance, stupidity and curiosity is found, it is an indication of a psychotic catastrophe in which these primal objects have been severely damaged. It is linked to the hatred of internal and external reality, and consequently of all aspects of the mental apparatus with which to grasp it and know it. In the psychotic part of the personality the container-contained relationship is negative and it does not occur in positive terms but in terms of stripping and denuding of meaning all aspects of reality, internal and external. It is a mental orientation and organization that is opposed to emotion and to meaning, and to thinking, and to learning from experience. It is dominated by an ego-destructive superego and as such it affirms superiority born of omnipotence and opposed to emotional relationships. We will discuss Bions clinical observations and we will study Edna OShaughnessys paper: Psychosis: not thinking in a bizarre world (1992) to help us gather the immense contribution Bion made to theory and clinical practice.

M. Gerard Fromm, PhD, ABPP

Clinical Case Conference

Ongoing throughout the academic year, 2013-14

9 sessions, 3 hours each session, 27 total

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Gerald Fromm, PhD, ABPP, is currently Senior Consultant to the Erikson Institute of the Austen Riggs Center, Clinical Instructor in Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and Assistant Clinical Professor, Yale Child Study Center. Dr. Fromm was the first Evelyn Stefansson Nef Director of the Erikson Institute from 2002-2013, and directed the Therapeutic Community Program at Riggs for many years.

Dr. Fromm is on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis and teaches at the Berkshire Psychoanalytic Institute, the Emory Psychoanalytic Institute and the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California. He is the current President of the International Society for the Psychoanalytic Study of Organizations, has served on the staff of Group Relations Conferences in the US, Europe and Israel, and is a member of the International Dialogue Initiative (working with Dr. Vamik Volkan on the psychodynamics of societal conflict) and the Academy for Critical Incident Analysis in New York.

Dr. Fromm’s many publications include: The Facilitating Environment: Clinical Applications of Winnicott’s Theory with Bruce L. Smith, PhD; Lost in Transference, Reaching toward Dreams: Clinical Studies in the Intermediate Area; and A Spirit That Impels: Play, Creativity and Psychoanalysis.

2013-2014 Courses

Marilyn Charles, PhD

Klein II: Contemporary British Kleinians: Theory and Technique

Saturday, September 21, 3013
Saturday, February 8, 2014
9-1, 2:30-5:30

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Marilyn Charles is a staff psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center and a psychoanalyst in private practice in Stockbridge and Richmond, MA. She is on faculty at several psychoanalytic institutes, and serves on the editorial boards of a number of psychoanalytic journals.  She has recently been voted President-elect of the American Psychological Association Division 39 (Psychoanalysis) Board of Directors and currently serves as APA Council Representative for the Division, where she plans to continue to advocate for greater understanding and appreciation of psychoanalytic offerings.  As the Co-Chair of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society (APCS) and also Co-Chair of the Division 39 Early Career Committee, she is actively engaged in mentoring and promoting community involvement for those in the helping professions, and supports psychoanalytic training, outreach, and research initiatives.  Her own research focuses on creativity, psychosis, and resilience.

Marilyn has taught extensively on topics such as transference/countertransference and dreams, and on theorists including Freud, Lacan, and members of the British Schools, such as Winnicott, Klein, and Bion.  For four years, she was a member of the London Clinical Seminars Group, meeting annually with senior British Kleinians to augment clinical understanding.  Marilyn has presented her work nationally and internationally, publishing over 80 articles and book chapters and four books: Patterns: Building Blocks of Experience (Analytic Press, 2002), Constructing Realities: Transformations Through Myth and Metaphor (Rodopi, 2004), Learning from Experience: a Guidebook for Clinicians (Analytic Press, 2004), and Working with Trauma: Lessons from Bion and Lacan (Jason Aronson, 2012). Currently in progress:  The Stories We Live: Life, Literature, and Psychoanalysis (Jason Aronson).

Seminar Description:

Klein II : Contemporary British Kleinian Theory and Technique

In this course, we will read papers from the contemporary British Kleinians, with an eye towards thinking about how to make use of these conceptualizations in our own clinical practice.

Seminar participants are expected to attend all sessions having read the assigned materials, so that we can have an informed discussion of the articles and related issues.  Participants should feel free to bring up questions and comments from the readings and also to bring up case material in relation to those readings.  The course will include readings on 1) Splitting and Projective Identification; 2) Transference/Countertransference; 3) Aggression and Defensive Organizations; and 4) Technical Considerations.

Danielle Knafo, PhD

Working with the Unconscious: Unconscious Fantasies, Dreams, Free Association, and Creativity

October 18-20, 2013
Fridays@CCP
October 18, 2013, 7-9pm
Transsexual Dreams: The Dance and Art of Psychoanalysis in Three Voices
Robert Morris Center, 401 S State St, 8th floor, Chicago, IL

Candidate Seminar:
Saturday, October 19: 7: 9-1, 2:30-4:30 Sunday, October 8:  9-1

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Danielle Knafo, PhD, is a Professor in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program at Long Island University. She is also faculty and supervisor at NYU’s Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. Dr. Knafo has written and lectured extensively on psychoanalysis, creativity, trauma, severe psychopathology and gender.  Her books include: Egon Schiele: A Self in Creation; Unconscious Fantasies and the Relational World; Living with Terror, Working with Trauma: A Clinician’s Handbook; In Her Own Image: Women’s Self-Representation in Twentieth-Century Art, and Dancing with the Unconscious: The Art of Psychoanalysis and The Psychoanalysis of Art.

Dr. Knafo has two blogs: SMILIU.net on serious mental illness and artfromtheedge.net, a virtual gallery of art created in or about extreme states.  She maintains a private practice in New York City and Great Neck, NY.

Seminar Description:

Working with the Unconscious: Unconscious Fantasies, Dreams, Free Association, and Creativity

This mini-course will address the multiple roles and manifestations of one of the giant pillars of psychoanalysis: the unconscious. Examination of the unconscious in psychological development, in psychopathology, in psychoanalytic treatment, and in the arts remains vital to both theory and technique, and cognitive neuroscience continues to prove Freud’s claim that most of our mental life is unconscious at any given moment. Emphasis will be on enhancing recognition of the manner in which patients and analysts play out core fantasies in their lives and in the treatment setting. Unconscious fantasies, defense mechanisms, dreams, free associations, transference/countertransference, nonverbal communication, and the creative process will be studied from theoretical, clinical, and applied perspectives. The literature on these central psychoanalytic concepts will be critically reviewed and brought up to date by integrating recent findings and models. Abundant case material will be presented to enhance techniques with which to recognize and work with material from the unconscious.

Jonathan Shedler, PhD

Treating the Challenging Patient: Case Formulation as a Roadmap to Treatment

December 6-8, 2013

December 6, 2013, 7-9pm
Fridays@CCP
The Efficacy of Psychodynamic Therapy:  The Talking Cure in the Era of Managed Care and Evidence Based Therapy
Robert Morris Center, 401 S State St, 8th floor, Chicago, IL

Candidate Seminar:
Saturday, December 7: 9-1, 2:30-4:30
Sunday, December 8:  9-1

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Jonathan Shedler, PhD, is a leading expert on personality and psychotherapy.  His article, The Efficacy of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, won international acclaim. Hailed as a contemporary classic, it established psychoanalytic psychotherapy as an evidence-based treatment.  His research and writing on personality patterns and disorders are shaping contemporary views of personality and its treatment.

Dr. Shedler is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, a faculty member at the Denver Psychoanalytic Institute, and formerly Director of Psychology at the University of Colorado Hospital Outpatient Psychiatry Service.  He is author of the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure (SWAP) for personality diagnosis and clinical case formulation.  Dr. Shedler leads workshops for professional audiences nationally and internationally on psychoanalytic treatment, clinical case formulation, and personality.  He is also a certified professional ski instructor at Vail Ski Resort.

Seminar Description:  Treating the Challenging Patient: Case Formulation as a Roadmap to Treatment

Psychoanalytic treatments—all treatments actually—are most effective when they have a clear focus, mutually shared by clinician and patient.  The treatment focus follows from a clearly articulated case formulation regarding the patient’s core personality dynamics—in other words, an understanding of where and what kind of therapeutic work will yield the most “bang for the buck” for a particular person.  Treatments, especially with more challenging patients, founder when they lack a clear focus, or when the focus is based on the clinician’s a priori theoretical commitments rather than the patient’s personality dynamics.  In this seminar, we will focus on developing sound psychoanalytic case formulations that can provide roadmaps for treatment, and practical application of the case formulation in day-to-day psychoanalytic work.  Seminar participants will have the opportunity to discuss cases—preferably, challenging cases where treatment is not going smoothly—to develop case formulations that can jumpstart a stalled treatment or focus a rambling one.  We will devote special attention to the role of transference-countertransference enactments as a source of information in developing and refining case formulations.   Participants will also have the opportunity to learn to use the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure (SWAP) as a practical (and scientifically grounded) aid in developing a sound psychoanalytic case formulation.

Peter Shabad, PhD

Passion, Loss, and Shame:  The Challenge of Mourning and Change

January 24, 2014, and 4-6 sessions during winter quarter

Friday, January 24, 2014
Fridays@CCP
The Spiritual Animal: Passion, Shame, and the Problem of the Disembodied Mind

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Candidate Seminar:
4-6 sessions during winter/spring quarter, Sunday afternoons or Monday evenings.  Dates to be decided with registrants.

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Peter Shabad, PhD is an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at Northwestern University Medical School, and is also on the Teaching Faculties of the Institute for Psychoanalysis in Chicago and the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis.  Dr. Shabad is co-editor of The Problem of Loss and Mourning: Psychoanalytic Perspectives (IUP,1989) and is the author of Despair and the Return of Hope:  Echoes of Mourning in Psychotherapy (Aronson, 2001).  He is the author of numerous papers and book chapters in psychoanalysis.  Dr. Shabad has a private practice in Chicago in psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy.

Seminar Description:

Passion, Loss, and Shame:  The Challenge of Mourning and Change

In this course I will examine how losses and disillusionments have profound effects on the passion necessary to grow and change throughout our lives.   I will devote special attention to how we turn losses outside of our control into shameful failures, and how that shame has the effect of inverting passion into passivity.  After delineating the developmental importance of chronic childhood disillusionments and their accompanying defenses, I will describe how the “intimate creation” of one’s constellation of symptoms is a means of both communicating and memorializing those disillusionments.  We then will examine various aspects of characterological passivity such as shame, self-pity, self-consciousness, resentment, entitlement, envy, perverse spite, and regret.  The final portion of the course will be addressed to the clinical relevance of issues such as the transference-counter-transference aspects of analytic passion and the disowned passion of the patient, developmental determinism versus agency and the corresponding analytic stances of love vs. respect, the paradox of the personal and the professional in the analytic relationship, the internal war between shoulds and wants, as well as many other issues.  Finally, I will contrast the omnipotent linearity of wish magic and the fear of one’s own destructiveness with the paradoxical effects of mourning in the talking cure.

Gerard Fromm, PhD

Transference/Countertransference Revisited

February 28 and March 1-2, 2014

February 28, 2014
Fridays@CCP
From Bodies to Words:  The Clinical Interplay of Transference and Countertransference
7-9 pm

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Candidate Seminar:
Saturday, March 1: 9-1, 2:30-4:30
Sunday, March 2nd: 9-1

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Gerald Fromm, PhD, ABPP, is currently Senior Consultant to the Erikson Institute of the Austen Riggs Center, Clinical Instructor in Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and Assistant Clinical Professor, Yale Child Study Center.  Dr. Fromm was the first Evelyn Stefansson Nef Director of the Erikson Institute from 2002-2013, and directed the Therapeutic Community Program at Riggs for many years.

Dr. Fromm is on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis and teaches at the Berkshire Psychoanalytic Institute, the Emory Psychoanalytic Institute and the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California.  He is the current President of the International Society for the Psychoanalytic Study of Organizations, has served on the staff of Group Relations Conferences in the US, Europe and Israel, and is a member of the International Dialogue Initiative (working with Dr. Vamik Volkan on the psychodynamics of societal conflict) and the Academy for Critical Incident Analysis in New York.

Dr. Fromm’s many publications include: The Facilitating Environment: Clinical Applications of Winnicott’s Theory with Bruce L. Smith, PhD; Lost in Transference, Reaching toward Dreams: Clinical Studies in the Intermediate Area; and A Spirit That Impels: Play, Creativity and Psychoanalysis.

Seminar Description:  In this seminar, we will revisit key moments in the evolution of two critical and intertwined psychoanalytic concepts: transference and countertransference.  We will highlight and contextualize important questions and examine their implications for clinical work.  We will explore what it means to “take” the transference, and, from that position, to use the countertransference therapeutically.

Seminar participants are expected to read the assigned articles and to attend all sessions.  Participants should feel free to bring up any questions and comments on the seminar topic, including those from other readings.  Participants are also asked to bring clinical material to the discussion, ideally in the form of process notes from one session.

Sue Grand, PhD

The Trans-generational Transmission of Trauma: Clinical Process

May 2-4, 2014

May 2, 2014
Fridays@CCP
Skin Memories: On Race, Love, and Loss
7-9 pm

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Candidate Seminar:
Saturday, May 3:  9-1, 2:30-4:30
Sunday, March 4:  9-1

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Sue Grand is faculty and supervisor at the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis; faculty, The Mitchell Center for Relational Psychoanalysis; faculty, trauma program at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies; supervisor, Manhattan Institute for Psychoanalysis; faculty, NYU Postdoctoral Trauma Program; and faculty, NYU Postdoctoral Program in Family and Couples Therapy. She is a visiting scholar at the Psychoanalytic Institute for Northern California, and at the NYU Trans-disciplinary Program in Trauma and Violence. She is associate editor of Psychoanalytic Dialogues and Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society. She is the author of The Reproduction of Evil: A Clinical and Cultural Perspective, and The Hero in the Mirror: From Fear to Fortitude. She is in private practice in NYC and in Teaneck, NJ.

Seminar Description We all carry the traumatic stories of our forebears. Sometimes explicit, more often inchoate, these stories live in our bodies. They shape our lives, our relationships, and inform our personal struggles. In this seminar, we will study the mechanisms of trans-generational transmission, the types of knowing and not-knowing that infuse this process, and ask how these legacies have informed our patients’ personal struggles. We will also inquire into the traumatic histories carried by the analyst, and inquire into the trans-generational inter-penetration that occurs between the mind of analyst and patient.

Clinical Case Conference 2013-14

Ongoing throughout the academic year, 2013-14
9 sessions, 3 hours each session, 27 total hours
Candidates are assigned annually to a case conference group.

Nancy Burke, PhD, is a graduate of CCP, a CCP Board member, and Director of the Two-Year Psychotherapy Program. She is an Associate Clinical Professor, Northwestern University Medical School.  She has been a Staff Psychologist and Director of Training at the Rehabilitation Program, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, a teaching clinic serving severely troubled outpatient adults. While at Rehab, she designed and secured funding to establish the Satellite Clinic of the Rehabilitation Program, which serves homeless and precariously-housed adults.  She has published in psychoanalytic journals including Psychoanalytic Psychology, the Psychoanalytic Review and Gender and Psychoanalysis, and is the editor of Gender & Envy.  She received her BA in Philosophy from Carleton College, and her MA and PhD in Human Development from the University of Chicago. She maintains a private practice in adult and adolescent psychotherapy in Evanston and Chicago.

Marilyn Charles, PhD, is a faculty member, supervisor, and advisor to the Board of the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. She is a Senior Staff Psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center, a psychoanalyst in private practice in Stockbridge and Richmond, MA, and the author of four books, Patterns: Essential Building Blocks of Experience (2002); Constructing Realities: Transformations Through Myth and Metaphor (2004); Learning from Experience: A Guidebook for Clinicians (2004); and Working with Trauma: Lessons from Bion and Lacan (2012).  Marilyn is President-elect of Division 39, Co-Chair of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society, a member of several psychoanalytic editorial boards, and maintains affiliations with Michigan State University, the Michigan Psychoanalytic Council, and the National Training Program.   She has a particular interest in mentoring, and was awarded the 2012 Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Development of Early Career Clinicians by the Division 39 Early Career Committee. In her writing, Marilyn has documented the traumatic underpinnings of psychosis, and is co-founder of the Austen Riggs Psychosis Research Study, looking intensively at the narratives, histories, and treatment experiences of individuals who have been labeled ‘psychotic.’  She is also an artist and poet, working extensively with individuals who experience creative blocks and researching cognitive and affective factors that may inhibit or help to consolidate creative capacities.  A special exhibition of her collages, titled “Fragments,” was exhibited in July, 2010, at the George Mason University Gallery and in May, 2012, at the Welles Gallery, Lenox, MA.

2012-2013

Marilyn Charles, PhD

Klein I: Melanie Herself

Friday September 28, 2012
Fridays@CCP
“Klein and Lacan Meet Twentieth Century Schizoid Man:
Fairy Stories for the Modern Era”

6:30pm: Registration and Reception
7-9pm: Lecture and Discussion

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates
Saturday, September 29: 9-1, 2:30-4:30
Sunday, September 30: 9-1

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Marilyn Charles, PhD, ABPP, is a faculty member, supervisor, and advisor to the Board of the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. She is a Senior Staff Psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center, a psychoanalyst in private practice in Stockbridge and Richmond, MA, and the author of four books, Patterns: Essential Building Blocks of Experience (2002); Constructing Realities: Transformations Through Myth and Metaphor (2004); Learning from Experience: A Guidebook for Clinicians (2004); and Working with Trauma: Lessons from Bion and Lacan (2012).  Marilyn is Co-Chair of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society, a member of several psychoanalytic editorial boards, and maintains affiliations with Michigan State University, the Michigan Psychoanalytic Council, and the National Training Program.   She has a particular interest in mentoring and was awarded the 2012 Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Development of Early Career Clinicians by the Division 39 Early Career Committee. In her writing, Marilyn has documented the traumatic underpinnings of psychosis. She is co-founder of the Austen Riggs Psychosis Research Study, looking intensively at the narratives, histories, and treatment experiences of individuals who have been labelled ‘psychotic’.  She is also an artist and poet, working extensively with individuals who experience creative blocks and researching cognitive and affective factors that may inhibit or help to consolidate creative capacities.  A special exhibition of her collages, titled “Fragments,” was exhibited in July 2010 at the George Mason University Gallery and in May 2012 at the Welles Gallery, Lenox, MA.

Seminar Description:
“Klein I: Melanie Herself”

In this course, we will use primary sources to look at some key conceptualizations from Klein with a particular view towards their clinical applications. Seminar participants are expected to attend all sessions having read the assigned materials, so that we can have an informed discussion of the articles and related issues.  Although we will focus most directly on the assigned readings, those who have read more extensively should feel free to bring up questions and comments from those readings.

Note: Plans are in order for Klein II, a seminar on post-Kleinians, to be taught by Marilyn Charles in 2013-14

Frank Summers, PhD

Contemporary Psychoanalytic Theory and Technique

November 30, 2012
Fridays@CCP
“The Expressivist Turn in Psychoanalysis: Contemporary Theory and Technique”

6:30pm: Registration and Reception
7-9pm: Lecture and discussion

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates, Friday mornings:
Dec 7, 21, 2012; Jan 4, 18; Feb 1, 2013; 10:30-12:30
333 East Ontario, Ste. 4509B Chicago, IL 60611

Frank Summers, PhD, ABPP, is a faculty member, supervisor, and advisor to the Board of the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. Dr. Summers is Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Supervising and Training Analyst at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. Beginning in January, 2013, Dr. Summers will serve as president of Division 39 (Division of Psychoanalysis) of the American Psychological Association. He holds faculty appointments at several other psychoanalytic institutes. Dr. Summers is the author of three books, a best- selling textbook, Object Relations Theories and Psychopathology: A Comprehensive Text, and two clinical monographs explicating his theory of psychoanalytic therapy, Transcending The Self: An Object Relations Model of Psychoanalytic Therapy and Self Creation: Psychoanalytic Therapy and the Art of the Possible. In addition, he has published widely in psychoanalytic journals on these topics as well as the application of psychoanalytic therapy to character disorders. A member of the editorial board of Psychoanalytic Psychology, and an associate editor of Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Dr. Summers has won numerous teaching awards, including the Distinguished Educator Award of the International Federation of Psychoanalytic Education and the Hans Strupp Award. His fourth book, The Psychoanalytic Vision: The Experiencing Subject, Transcendence, and the Therapeutic Process is due out early in 2013. Dr. Summers maintains a private practice of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy, as well as consultation, supervision, and study groups, in Chicago, Illinois.

About the Fridays@CCP presentation
“The Expressivist Turn in Psychoanalysis: Contemporary Theory and Technique.”

“This talk will look at contemporary psychoanalytic theory and therapy as both an evolution from and a decisive break from the past. The history of analytic therapy and technique will be sketched from the viewpoint of the model of the mind and mental functioning utilized in classical, neo-classical, and contemporary psychoanalytic therapy. While the relational turn gets the lion’s share of attention in contemporary analytic discourse, it will be argued that an additional, equally compelling, and decisive shift has occurred despite being little recognized. Borrowing a term from Charles Taylor, I call this transformation of analytic thought the expressivist turn in psychoanalysis. The main figures in this movement will be discussed and then the theory of analytic therapy will be spelled out to demonstrate some of the primary clinical implications of this decisive transformation in the analytic model of mind and its clinical derivative.”

Michael O’Loughlin, PhD

Working Obliquely With Children: Engaging the Child’s Desire in Psychotherapy

January 25-27, 2013
Fridays@CCP
“The Great Hunger in Ireland: A case study on intergenerational trauma transmission with clinical implications”

6:30pm: Registration and Reception
7-9pm: Lecture and discussion

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates Saturday, January 28: 9-1, 2:30-4:30 Sunday, January 29: 9-1

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Michael O’Loughlin, PhD, professor at Adelphi University, New York, is on the faculty of Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies and in the School of Education. He is a clinical and research supervisor in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology and on the faculty of the Postgraduate Programs in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy at Adelphi. O’Loughlin is the author of The Subject of Childhood in 2009 and editor of Imagining Children Otherwise: Theoretical and Critical Perspectives on Childhood Subjectivity with Richard Johnson in 2010, as well as co-editor with Glenys Lobban and Cora Smith of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Contemporary South Africa: Theory, Practice, and Policy Perspectives, (University of Witwatersrand Press, Johannesburg, in press) and editor of two forthcoming books on children’s emotional lives (Jason Aronson, in press). His interests include the working through of intergenerational and collective trauma, the social origins of psychosis and schizophrenia, and the emotional lives of children. He is currently Co-Chair of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society and a research affiliate at Austen Riggs Center where he conducts research on psychosis.

Seminar Description:
“Working obliquely with children: Engaging the child’s desire in psychotherapy”

In this seminar we will use autobiographical material, an archive of children’s drawings, excerpts from notable films about children’s lives, children’s books, and relevant clinical material to pose the problem of the child’s desire as a core focus of analytic therapy. The concept of obliqueness comes from Maud Mannoni’s writings in which she argues for a non-intrusive but highly analytic approach to child material. Points of correspondence and contrast between this and the Winnicottian and Kleinian traditions will be explored using case material. Consideration will also be given to collateral family work and particularly to the role intergenerational trauma transmission plays in the deviation of the child’s libido and the development of potential impasses and dysregulations.

Judith Bertacchi, M.Ed, LSW

Early Beginnings: Implications for Practice

Candidate Seminar:
Dates to be determined, 12 hours, 4 three-hour sessions meeting throughout the year
555 N Lake Shore Drive, #606, Chicago

Judith Grimes Bertacchi, M.Ed, LSW, graduated from Erikson Institute for Advanced Studies in Child Development, and served as a trustee for the school from 1991 to 2003. She was a founding member and the second president for the Illinois Association for Infant Mental Health. Early in her career, Judith participated in a psychoanalytic study group on early development, psychological structures, and clinical interventions while working at Virginia Frank Child Development Center. Over her 28-year tenure at the center, Judith moved from staff member to supervisor to director, overseeing therapy and counseling for families, individual treatment of children, an intensive daily therapeutic nursery, and preventive outreach work with center, hospital and community based infant and toddler programs. In 1994, Judith became a member of the Executive Team at Ounce of Prevention Fund in Chicago. Throughout her career, Judith has been sharing her knowledge and experience with students at Erikson Institute, Institute for Clinical Social Work, the University of Chicago School of Social Work, and medical students in their Psychiatry rotation at the University of Illinois. She is a nationally renowned consultant on Reflective Supervision to agencies and institutions. Judith has also published and edited pieces on Reflective Supervision and Practice for the national organization, Zero to Three. She was appointed to the CCP Auxiliary Board in 2011.

Seminar Description:
“Early Beginnings: Implications for Practice”

This Seminar is for students interested in reading and discussing seminal theories of infant development and infant mental health. Periodic observation of a baby and family will ground this seminar. Participants may explore their own early attachments and possible influences on their professional practice.

Neil Altman, PhD

Psychoanalysis in Cultural Context

March 8-10, 2013

Fridays@CCP
“Psychoanalysis in Cultural Context”

6:30: Registration and Reception
7-9pm: Lecture and discussion

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates Saturday, January 28: 9-1, 2:30-4:30 Sunday, January 29: 9-1

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Seminar continues for registered candidates:
Saturday, March 10, 2012: 9-1, 2:30-4:30
Sunday, March 11, 2012: 9am-1pm

Neil Altman, PhD, is Editor Emeritus of Psychoanalytic Dialogues: the International Journal of Relational Perspectives, and Visiting Professor at the Ambedkar University of Delhi, India. where he was a Fulbright Scholar in 2011. He is an Honorary Member of the William Alanson White Psychoanalytic Society, where he co-teaches a class on race, culture and psychoanalysis.  He is the author of The Analyst in the Inner City: Race, Class, and Culture through a Psychoanalytic Lens, published in a Second Edition by Routledge in 2009. He is co-author of Relational Child Therapy, published by Other Press in 2002.  Dr. Altman worked in Community Mental Health Centers in the South Bronx from 1977-1991. He is on the Board of Directors of the Fostering Connection, an organization that promotes pro bono mental health work with foster youth in New York City. He has taught and lectured widely around the world, and published numerous articles about race, social class, and culture in psychoanalysis and psychotherapeutic work.

Seminar Description:
“Psychoanalysis in Cultural Context”

The seminar will consider the specific cultural contexts of various psychoanalytic theories and practices.  Psychoanalysis takes different forms depending on the cultural context in which it arises.  A particular version of psychoanalysis may be more or less cultural syntonic and more or less culturally comprehensible, or differently comprehensible, within specific cultural contexts.  We will consider examples of psychoanalytic theories and technical practices, along with the cultural backgrounds in which they arose and how they might need to be modified as the surrounding culture changes across generations, population groups, and geographical locations.  Clinical narratives will illustrate these points, along with a consideration of how cultural similarities and differences enter into transference and countertransference, becoming an inherent part of the psychoanalytic work.

Nancy Burke, PhD

Freud for Beginners

Friday, April 5, 2013
Fridays@CCP
“On the Art of Mis-Reading Freud”

6:30pm Registration and Reception
7-9pm Lecture and discussion

The Chicago School325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates:
Sunday mornings: April 7, 14, 21, 2013 10:30-1:20
708 Church St. #223, Evanston

Nancy Burke, PhD, is a graduate of CCP, a CCP Board member, and Director of the Two-Year Psychotherapy Program. She is an Associate Clinical Professor, Northwestern University Medical School. Previously, she had been a Staff Psychologist and Director of Training at the Rehabilitation Program, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, a teaching clinic serving severely troubled outpatient adults. While at Rehab, she designed and secured funding to establish the Satellite Clinic of the Rehabilitation Program, which serves homeless and precariously housed adults. She has published in psychoanalytic journals including Psychoanalytic Psychology, the Psychoanalytic Review and Gender and Psychoanalysis, and is the editor of Gender & Envy. She received her BA in Philosophy from Carleton College, and her MA and PhD in Human Development from the University of Chicago. She maintains a private practice in adult and adolescent psychotherapy in Evanston and Chicago.

Seminar Description:
“I hope this course will act as a trail head for those candidates wishing to develop, personally and professionally, through their own journeys with Freud’s work. I am not a Freud scholar, nor will this course offer a primer on the trajectories of Freud’s ideas. Rather, I am a clinician who has made use of Freud’s ideas in ways that are no doubt idiosyncratic, and yet have seemed to offer much to me and my patients over time. My aim is to use this course to offer encouragement to those wishing to find their own ways of using Freud to animate their work.”

Faculty: TBA

The Opening Phase of Psychoanalysis

Instructor, Dates, Times, Location TBA This seminar will meet 6-8 times throughout the academic year.

Clinical Case Conference 2012-13

“Ongoing throughout the academic year”
9 sessions, 3 hours each session, 27 total hours, 2 groups (Burke and Charles)

Nancy Burke, PhD

Clinical Case Conference

Nancy Burke, PhD, is a graduate of CCP, a CCP Board member, and Director of the Two-Year Psychotherapy Program. She is an Associate Clinical Professor, Northwestern University Medical School. Previously, she had been a Staff Psychologist and Director of Training at the Rehabilitation Program, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, a teaching clinic serving severely troubled outpatient adults. While at Rehab, she designed and secured funding to establish the Satellite Clinic of the Rehabilitation Program, which serves homeless and precariously housed adults. She has published in psychoanalytic journals including Psychoanalytic Psychology, the Psychoanalytic Review and Gender and Psychoanalysis, and is the editor of Gender & Envy. She received her BA in Philosophy from Carleton College, and her MA and PhD in Human Development from the University of Chicago. She maintains a private practice in adult and adolescent psychotherapy in Evanston and Chicago.

Second Sundays; September – November; and January – June.
9am – 12noon

Marilyn Charles, PhD

Clinical Case Conference

Marilyn Charles, PhD, ABPP, is a faculty member, supervisor, and advisor to the Board of the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. She is a Senior Staff Psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center, a psychoanalyst in private practice in Stockbridge and Richmond, MA, and the author of four books, Patterns: Essential Building Blocks of Experience (2002); Constructing Realities: Transformations Through Myth and Metaphor (2004); Learning from Experience: A Guidebook for Clinicians (2004); and Working with Trauma: Lessons from Bion and Lacan (2012).  Marilyn is Co-Chair of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society, a member of several psychoanalytic editorial boards, and maintains affiliations with Michigan State University, the Michigan Psychoanalytic Council, and the National Training Program.   She has a particular interest in mentoring and was awarded the 2012 Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Development of Early Career Clinicians by the Division 39 Early Career Committee. In her writing, Marilyn has documented the traumatic underpinnings of psychosis. She is co-founder of the Austen Riggs Psychosis Research Study, looking intensively at the narratives, histories, and treatment experiences of individuals who have been labelled ‘psychotic’.  She is also an artist and poet, working extensively with individuals who experience creative blocks and researching cognitive and affective factors that may inhibit or help to consolidate creative capacities.  A special exhibition of her collages, titled “Fragments,” was exhibited in July 2010 at the George Mason University Gallery and in May 2012 at the Welles Gallery, Lenox, MA.

In person and Skype meetings, Dates and Location TBA

2011-2012

David George, PhD

On the Road: Latin American Road Movies and the Encounter with the Other

September 23, 2011
Fridays@CCP
The Marcia Adler Annual Memorial Lecture

Those who are unable to join us for the 5:30 Reception and Registration and the 6pm screening are welcome to watch the film on their own and join us for the discussion at 8pm.

5:30pm Reception and Registration
6-8pm Screening of film, “Motorcycle Diaries”
8-9:15pm Lecture and Discussion

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

David George, PhD, is a professor of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies at Lake Forest College. He has also taught at the Chicago Newberry Library, Middlebury College, and the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil). He has published five books and dozens of articles on Latin American culture. His latest book, published in 2010, is titled “Nelson Rodrigues and the Invention of Brazilian Drama.” Dr. George has received awards from the National Endowment from the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, Social Science Research Council, and Fulbright Commission. In 2010 he received the Lake Forest College Trustee Award for Teaching Excellence and Campus Leadership.

“On the road: Latin American Road Movies and the Encounter with the Other”
Travel writing and road movies share the central theme of encounter with the other. These movies invite us to grapple with powerful questions. If the travel account articulates itself through certain familiar binaries — familiar and exotic, barbarous and civilized, rustic and urban, conquering and conquered — in what ways is a movie’s navigation of these binaries variously contingent on the traveler’s gender, nationality, historic surround, and psychological states? Which ideologies permeate road movies, and how does ideology condition such “objective” matters as a traveler’s itinerary or view of landscape? What factors differentiate fictional and non-fictional travel narratives? In this regard, road movies such as “Motorcycle Diaries” combine both fictional and non-fictional elements. How do road movies define nation? How do all these combined factors influence the traveler’s “gaze,” his or her view of the other’s cultural, social, political, racial, and psychological differences?

Throughout the year, on three Sundays, David George will lead a series of film workshops to address these questions. Following is a list of Latin American road movies that would serve well the purpose of this project:
“Central Station” (Brazil)
“Y Tu Mamà Tambièn” (Mexico)
“Intimate Stories” (Argentina)

Jacob (Cobi) Avshalom

Looking for a Personal Psychoanalytic Compass

October 14-16, 2011

Friday 7-9pm
Saturday 9am-1pm; 2:30-4:30pm
Sunday 9am-1pm

30 N Michigan Ave, Chicago
10th Floor Conference Room

Cobi Avshalom, a graduate of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, is a training psychoanalyst and former president, founding member, teacher and supervisor of the Tel Aviv Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis (TAICP). In addition to his position at TAICP, he teaches and supervises in the Post-Graduate Programs for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy at Bar Ilan University in Tel Aviv and The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He is particularly interested in transference and countertransference issues. His focus for this class on the development of a personal psychoanalytic compass is one which he has addressed previously, both in earlier presentations and publications.

Seminar Description:
“Looking for a Personal Psychoanalytic Compass”

As analysts, we are all in the process of developing or looking for an inner structure, a personal psychoanalytic compass, which evolves and crystallizes throughout our professional lives. In this seminar, I hope to invite you to join me in looking at some of the more significant readings that have shaped my journey and that continue to accompany me in each analytic hour. I trust that this seminar will provide an opportunity for participants to think about and further identify the personal psychoanalytic compass they use in their own daily clinical encounters.

The reading list includes classic papers by Strachey, Ogden, Joseph, Symington, Bollas, Renik, Erhenberg and Davies. In addition to the assigned reading, we will look at clinical material, my own and yours. Please be ready to present fresh clinical vignettes provoked by your experience of the readings.

Francoise Meltzer, PhD

Psychoanalysis and Literature

November 11, 2011
Fridays@CCP

6:30pm: Registration and Reception
7-9pm: Lecture and discussion

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates, Saturdays: November 5, 12, 19, 2011 9am to 12:30pm, Location TBA

Francoise Meltzer, Ph.D., is the Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities and Chair of the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago. She is also a professor in the Philosophy of Religions at the Divinity School. She has been a co-editor of the journal Critical Inquiry since 1982. Her most recent book is Seeing Double: Baudelaire’s Modernity (University of Chicago Press, Spring, 2011). She has co-edited a book on saints in the three monotheistic religions (University of Chicago Press, Fall, 2011) and has another forthcoming book on the essays of Jacques Derrida. She is presently working on a book about ruins in the Berlin of 1945.

Seminar Description:
“Psychoanalysis and Literature”
The purpose of the seminar is to consider how psychoanalysts, specifically Freud and Lacan, have used the literary text to show the structure of the unconscious. This approach helps to elucidate how literary text works in psychoanalytic theory and also enables us to clarify the assumptions about the unconscious made by both Freud and Lacan.

In order to consider the meaning of the literary text for Freud, particularly how he understands text as one manifestation of the unconscious, the class will read selections from Freud’s metapsychological papers as well as part of the The Interpretation of Dreams. We will also read two works by Lacan: The Mirror Stage will allow us to talk about his ‘three registers;’ The Seminar on the Purloined Letter engages a literary text as the unconscious made manifest.

Brian Koehler, PhD

The Neuroscience of Relational Trauma, Dissociation, Social Isolation and Loneliness: A Neuropsychoanalytic Model of Psychotic Disorders

Friday, January 27, 2012
Fridays@CCP

6:30pm: Registration and Reception
7-9pm: Lecture and discussion open to invited public
Location TBA

Seminar continues for registered candidates in January, final dates TBA
Saturday: 9am-1pm, 2:30-4:30pm
Sunday, January 29: 9am-1pm
Location: TBA

Brian Koehler, PhD is a psychologist-psychoanalyst and current president of the United States Chapter of the International Society for the Psychological treatments of the Schizophrenias and other psychoses (ISPS-US) as well as executive board member of ISPS and chair of the New York Branch of ISPS-US. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and the School of Social Work at New York University, as well as in the Graduate Psychology Program at City University of New York. Dr Koehler is affiliated with several other New York psychoanalytic institutes, including the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy, the Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Study Center and the National Institute for the Psychotherapies. He is an Associate Editor for the journal Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches and has published many articles on neuroscience and psychosis psychotherapy. He has a private practice in Hastings-on-Hudson, NY and in Manhattan.

About the January 27th presentation:
Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?
Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?
T.S. Eliot from The Rock

“What we teach today is part biology and part history…but we don’t always know where one ends and the other begins”
-JT Bonner

Eisenberg (2004) cautioned our field to steer between the brainless psychiatry of the past and the mindless psychiatry of the present. This paper will attempt to integrate the “science of the day,” i.e., neuroscience, with the “science of the night,” i.e., the thoroughly personal and subjective. Cichetti (2010), from a developmental psychopathology perspective, emphasized that the abnormalities in the broad domains of genetics, neurobiology, cognition, emotion and interpersonal relationships in severe mental disorders do not exist in isolation. He encouraged researchers to strive to comprehend the interrelationships between the biological, psychological and social in these disorders. This paper will attempt to integrate research and clinical findings across the complex domains of brain, mind/self and culture. Over the past decade, psychoanalysts have accelerated their attempts to relate the third-person findings of neurobiology and cognitive, affective, and social neuroscience with the second- and first-person observations within the psychoanalytic setting. The relatively new field of neuropsychoanalysis has inspired many in the field to articulate the relevance of neuroscience to the psychoanalyst. A neuropsychoanalytic model will be presented on the psychoses after a brief review of contemporary research in genetics, epigenetics, neurobiology, social neuroscience and epidemiology. A developmental traumatology review of the effects of relational-interpersonal traumas, e.g., neglect, unavailability, social defeat and social isolation, on the brain and person will be presented. A case will then be made for the central psychobiological threat of unrelatedness and profound loneliness in the expressions of the psychoses at all levels, especially the epigenetic, neurobiological, psychosocial and phenomenological. Relational psychosis psychotherapy will be introduced, along with its theoretical and clinical foundations, as a person-specific psychosocial therapy for the psychoses.

The seminar will go into more depth on the subjects touched on in the Friday evening colloquium. Contemporary neurogenetics, epigenetics, neurobiology, social neuroscience, epidemiology, and sociocultural research on the psychoses, especially the schizophrenias, will be reviewed, as well as current psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral (CBTp) models. Such important subjects as epigenetics and the transgenerational transmission of trauma, neuroplasticity, gene-environment interactions, developmental traumatology and psychobiology, and sociocultural research will be covered. The effects of relational traumas will be examined in depth at various levels of organization including the molecular, neurobiological and social-psychological. A neuropsychoanalytic model, centered on psychobiological attachment theory and relatedness, will be presented in which research findings across the complex domains of brain, mind/self and culture will be integrated with observations arising from long-term psychotherapeutic experience with persons diagnosed with severe mental disorders. Clinical material illustrating relational psychosis psychotherapy will be presented.

Ken Corbett, PhD

Psychoanalysis and Gender

March 9-11, 2012

March 9, 2012
Fridays@CCP
“Yes: The Constitutive Necessity of Perversion”
6:30: Registration and Reception
7-9pm: Lecture and discussion

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates
Saturday, March 10: 9am-1pm, 2:30-4:30pm Sunday, March 11: 9am-1pm 30 N Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 10th Floor Conference Room

Seminar continues for registered candidates:
Saturday, March 10, 2012: 9-1, 2:30-4:30
Sunday, March 11, 2012: 9am-1pm

Ken Corbett, PhD, is Assistant Professor, New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. He is the author of Boyhoods: Rethinking Masculinities.

This course on gender and psychoanalysis is designed to track the development of psychoanalytic gender theory from Freud’s original drive model to second wave theory (the move from drive to attachment and inter-subjectivity) to modern reconsiderations that further follow on feminism and queer theory (the move from identification to complexity and the determining force of norms).

Our goal is to consider how gender is embodied and constituted via fantasy, organic excitability, desire, neuron, muscle, relationality, injury, and practice. We will seek to understand how the gendered body comes to matter in a complex socio-cultural field, open to multiple points of reference, normative expectation, and idiomatic relational meanings. Gender is that which is replicated via normative regulation. But it is also open to transformation, and made distinctive through the unique iteration of personhood and the unfolding malleability of social life.

Irwin Hoffman, PhD

Clinical, Epistemological, and Moral Dimensions of “Dialectical Constructivism”

April 27, 2012
Fridays@CCP

6:30pm Registration and Reception
7-9pm Lecture and discussion

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Seminar continues for registered candidates
Mondays 7-9pm
April 30; May 7, 14, 21; June 4, 2012
Dr. Hoffman’s office, 25 E Washington, Ste. 1203, Chicago

Irwin Z. Hoffman, PhD is faculty and supervising analyst at the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis and at the National Training Program for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, lecturer in Psychiatry at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, and Adjunct Clinical Professor at the New York University Post-Graduate Program in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. He is on the editorial board of Psychoanalytic Dialogues, is a corresponding editor for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, and has served on the board of The International Journal of Psychoanalysis. He is the author of a series of publications developing his “dialectical-constructivist” point of view, including his book, Ritual and Spontaneity in the Psychoanalytic Process: A Dialectical Constructivist View” (The Analytic Press, 1998). Since the book, Dr. Hoffman has published a series of essays that take this point of view to new frontiers. Dr. Hoffman is in private practice in Chicago.

We’ll begin by conveying essential elements of a perspective on the psychoanalytic process that I’ve called “dialectical constructivism.” Among the features of this viewpoint to be highlighted will be its integration of existential and more traditional psychoanalytic ideas. Experience is ambiguous and therefore fertile ground for multiple plausible interpretations and wellspring for many kinds of action. As a function of the ritual asymmetry of the analytic situation combined with the patient’s transference disposition, the analytic therapist has special power to overcome the neurotogenic influences of early bad object ties, even as they are played out within the analytic relationship, and to affirm the patient as a creative agent in that very relationship and in the world. What I am reacting against when I underscore the responsible agency of the participants are very deeply entrenched concepts that reside at the core of the psychoanalytic tradition. In particular I am thinking of concepts such as psychic determinism, free association, and evenly hovering attention, all of which serve the pursuit of an illusory “objective” truth while radically limiting the responsibility of the participants for their value-laden choices. To underscore the participants’ agency is not to deny that they are acting in ways that are heavily influenced by their personal histories, by their intrapsychic dynamics, by the interplay of the transference and the countertransference, and by their embeddedness in a sociocultural surround that shapes every moment of their encounter. The latter is often ignored in conceptualizing the nature of analytic work. A constructivist perspective challenges therapists to think critically about the socio-political context and implications of the patient’s experience. It also encourages therapists’ critical reflection on the moral implications and potentials of their influence in the analytic process.

Seminar Objectives
1. Understand the basic principles of the perspective on the analytic process that I call “dialectical constructivism” and know the basics of the antithetical perspective, that of objectivism.
2. Understand the grounds for advancement of “knowledge” in our field, the place of systematic empirical research, the place of “nonlinear constructivist learning.”
3. Understand the social-political-moral implications of dialectical constructivism in the context of clinical work

Jane Gallop, PhD

Feminist and Queer Psychoanalysis

Saturday April 28, 2012 in Chicago, 9am-4pm
30 N Michigan, Chicago, 10th Floor Conference Room

Saturday, May 12, 2012 in Milwaukee 9am-4pm
161 W Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Jane Gallop, PhD is Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee. She has published a number of books at the intersection of poststructuralist feminist and psychoanalytic theory, including: The Daughter’s Seduction: Feminism and Psychoanalysis (1982), Reading Lacan (1985), Thinking Through the Body (1987), and Anecdotal Theory (2002). She has also published a pair of hybrid memoir/theory books reflecting on her work and home life: Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment (1997) and Living with his Camera (2003). Gallop is currently doing work in Queer Theory and has just completed a book on the queer temporality of writing, how the reader and the writer are haunted by the death of the author.

Although a continuation of Gallop’s 2012 seminar, this seminar is open to all. Participants will look in detail at the work of two majorauthors who use a combination of psychoanalytic theory and queer theory: Judith Butler and Leo Bersani.

We will read two books by each of these authors, and do both close textual analysis and clinical application:
Butler, one of the most important thinkers in the Humanities today, uses Freudian theory to rethink gender.
Bersani uses Freud to think the darker side of sexuality.

Clinical Case Conference 2011-12

Ongoing throughout the academic year, 27 total hours
Mondays: dates, times and location to be furthered determined by the group leader and the group.

Nancy Burke

Clinical Case Conference

Nancy Burke, PhD, is a graduate of CCP, board member, Faculty, and Director of the Two-Year Psychotherapy Program. She is an Assistant Clinical Professor, Northwestern University Medical School. Previously, she had been a Staff Psychologist and Director of Training at the Rehabilitation Program, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, a teaching clinic serving severely mentally ill outpatient adults. While at Rehab, she designed and secured funding to establish the Satellite Clinic of the Rehabilitation Program, which serves homeless mentally ill outpatients. She received her BA in Philosophy from Carleton College, and her MA and PhD in Human Development from the University of Chicago. She maintains a private practice in adult and adolescent psychotherapy in Evanston and Chicago.

Frank Summers

Clinical Case Conference

Ongoing throughout the academic year, 2011-12, 27 total hours

Frank Summers, PhD, is a faculty member, supervisor, and advisor to the Board of the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. Dr. Summers is the author of three books, a best-selling textbook, Object Relations Theories and Psychopathology: A Comprehensive Text, and two clinical monographs explicating his theory of psychoanalytic therapy, Transcending The Self: An Object Relations Model of Psychoanalytic Therapy and Self Creation: Psychoanalytic Therapy and the Art of the Possible. In addition, he has published widely in psychoanalytic journals on these topics as well as the application of psychoanalytic therapy to character disorders. Dr. Summers is a Diplomat in Clinical Psychology of the American Board of Professional Psychology, a Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, and holds faculty appointments at the Minnesota Institute of Psychoanalysis, the Wisconsin Institute for Psychoanalysis, and the Tampa Bay Psychoanalytic Institute, and the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis, where he is also a training analyst. A member of the editorial board of Psychoanalytic Psychology, and an associate editor of Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Dr. Summers has won numerous teaching awards, including the Distinguished Educator Award of the International Federation of Psychoanalytic Education and the Hans Strupp Award.

Dr. Summers maintains a private practice in Chicago Illinois. His practice consists of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy, consultation, supervision, and study groups. Areas of specialization include depression, anxiety, identity confusion, relationship difficulties, problems of unfulfilled potential, and the application of psychoanalytic therapy to severe emotional disturbance.

2010-2011

Hedda Bolgar, PhD

(via Skype)

Clinical Case Conference

Oct 10, 24, Nov 7, 21, 2010
Sundays 1-4

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Hedda Bolgar, PhD, ABPP, was born in 1909 in Vienna. She received her PhD from the University of Vienna in 1934 and left Austria in 1938, the day of Hitler’s arrival. Dr Bolgar completed her postdoctoral training in Chicago at Michael Reese Hospital and her analytic training at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis, where she worked with Franz Alexander and Heinz Kohut. A founder of WILA (the Wright Institute Los Angeles) in 1974, an outpatient low fee mental health clinic and training center, Dr Bolgar also played a central role in the founding and development of the Los Angeles Institute and Society for Psychoanalytic Studies. In April, 2010, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from Division 39 of APA, just prior to her 101st birthday. Throughout her life, Dr Bolgar has focused on the integration of psychic and external realities and the role of the psychoanalyst in political and social realities. She currently teaches, supervises, and sees patients in private practice in Los Angeles.

Gila Ofer, PhD

The Individual, the Interpersonal, and the Social: Readings in Winnicott and Bion

Oct 15-17, 2010: Fri 5:30-9pm for Fridays@CCP
Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

Fridays@CCP

October 15, 2010, 5:30 – 9PM
The Annual Marcia Adler Memorial Lecture

“Transformations: Healing of Trauma and Oppression” as seen in the 2005 movie “As It Is in Heaven” directed by Kay Pollak.” The evening will include a viewing of the film, followed by a discussion led by Dr Ofer.

In this course we will focus on two of the greatest psychoanalytic theorists: Donald Winnicott and Wilfred Bion. Both of them developed a process-based theory of self, a self in process with few fixed points along the journey. Both refused to be pinned down to rigid systematic explanations. Both developed fluid and open models of subjectivity, emphasizing the importance of personal meaning as a goal, but within an interpersonal matrix. Both viewed the birth of the baby as profoundly intersubjective, emphasizing the role of the mother who must adapt to the needs of the infant. They believed in the importance of external reality — in particular the early maternal environment and the evolution of self and the thought process.

We will also look at the similarities in perspective (in theory and practice) between Winnicott and Bion, but also at their differences, keeping in mind pluralistic thinking and the ability to shift perspective. Participants will be asked to share their clinical experiences.

Gila Ofer has a BA in English and French literature from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. She has an MA in clinical psychology from Tel-Aviv University and received her PhD in psychology from Bar-Ilan University, Israel.

Dr. Ofer is a founding member and past president of The Tel-Aviv Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis. She is also a founding member of The Israeli Institute of Group Analysis. She is on the faculty of both institutes as a teacher and supervisor. She is also a supervisor and on the faculty of the Post-Graduate School for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Tel-Aviv University. She is the past editor and currently an associate editor of “Mikbatz,” the Israeli journal of group psychotherapy.

Dr. Ofer has published her work in leading journals. Her papers deal with diverse topics, such as the influence of the analyst’s dreams on the analytic process; the influence of the analyst’s illness on the psychoanalytic process; curiosity; love and hate in psychoanalysis; relational psychoanalysis; gender and psychoanalysis; the social unconscious. She has presented her work and taught in Israel, Europe and the US.

Dr. Ofer is a member of the executive board of the European Federation of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (EFPP). She is also a member of the advisory board of CCP.

Readings
  1. Winnicott, D.W. (1967). The location of cultural experience. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 48.
  2. Winnicott, D.W. (1969). The Use of an Object and Relating through Identifications. In: Playing and Reality (1971).
  3. Winnicott, D.W. (1971). Dreaming, Fantasying, and Living: A Case-history describing a Primary Dissociation. In: Playing and Reality.
  4. Bion, W.R. (1970). Attention and Interpretation. Ch. 2: Medicine as a Model, and ch. 7: container and contained.
  5. Bion, W.R. (1967). A theory of thinking. In: Second thoughts.
  6. Bion, W.R. (1994; 1987). Clinical Seminars: Brasilia. Cases 7 and 8.
Recommended
  1. Symington N. & Symington J. (1996). The clinical thinking of Wilfred Bion. London: Routledge.
  2. Little, M. (1990). Psychotic anxieties and containment. (Epilogue: a comment on Donald Winnicott).

Deborah Luepnitz, PhD

Devotion and Desire: Working with Winnicott and Lacan

Nov 12-14, 2010: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP
Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

The aim of this course is to bring into provocative contact two of the greatest psychoanalytic originals since Freud: Donald Winnicott and Jacques Lacan. Although American analysts have long appreciated the work of Winnicott and the British Middle Group, they have avoided Lacan, relegating his “obscure” texts to literature and cultural studies departments.

Dr. Deborah Luepnitz is known for her capacity to make Lacan accessible without sacrificing complexity. She will use Winnicott’s familiar work as a humanistic counterpoint to Lacan’s post-humanism, contrasting their views of: the mirror stage, the goals of treatment, their use of diagnostic categories, and their clinical techniques.

Participants will learn fundamental Lacanian constructs such as: the three registers, the divided subject, the desire of the Other, the family complexes, and the jouissance of the symptom. Clinical examples will illustrate the use of Winnicott and Lacan in her own psychoanalytic practice.

A videotaped interview of Lacan and an audiotaped address by Winnicott will introduce participants to the delightful style and wit of: “Winnicott, the analyst of devotion and Lacan, the analyst of desire.”

Deborah Anna Luepnitz is on the clinical Faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She is the author of The Family Interpreted: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Family Therapy (1988) and more recently, Schopenhauer’s Porcupines: Intimacy and Its Dilemmas, a book of psychotherapy cases directed towards a general audience. Published in 2001, it has been translated into 6 languages. Dr Luepnitz was also a contributing author to the Cambridge Companion to Lacan. Her article titled “Thinking in the Space Between Winnicott and Lacan” was published last year in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis. Four years ago, Dr Luepnitz founded Insight for All (IFA), which connects pro bono analysts with formerly homeless men and women living in residence. She maintains a private practice in Philadelphia.

Readings
  1. Donald Winnicott, “Mirror Role of Mother and Family in Child Development.” InPlaying and Reality. London: Tavistock. pp. 111-118
  2. Jacques Lacan. “The mirror stage as formative of the function of the “I” as revealed in psychoanalytic experience.” Ecrits: A Selection. NY: Norton, l977, pp 1-7.
  3. Deborah Luepnitz, “Thinking in the Space Between Winnicott and Lacan.” International Journal of Psychoanalysis. Vol. 90 (5) October, 2009, pp 957-981.

Gemma Maragoni Ainslie, PhD, ABPP

Gender: Conceptualizations, Clinical Considerations

Feb 11-13, 2011
Fri 7-9pm, Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

This course will examine historical and recent psychoanalytic understandings of gender from a developmental perspective, with an eye towards considering implications of gender in our clinical work. One need pivot Freud’s focus on sexuality only slightly to view gender as his central concern, from his emphasis on the phallus to his puzzlement as to what women want. Not quite a century later, thinkers from multiple disciplines have questioned what in Freud’s time was a given – male or female, male vs. female, a binary assignment and living of gender. In response to both biological possibilities and cultural shifts from the 1960s forward, psychoanalysis, too, has had to review and rethink our theory and our practice regarding gender.

What do we “know” about how gender identity develops? Are there nodal points in development which are particularly salient for gender identity formation? What can we posit about the impact of parents and other significant objects on its formation? What is the relationship between gender identity and sexual orientation? What is gained and what is lost in “committing to” a gender identity?

From a clinical perspective, the presence of two gendered individuals in the intimate exchange of psychoanalysis can be viewed as most salient in the transference-countertransference. From the moment a prospective analysand contacts us, we have a sense of and a response to their gender. This process is so automatic as to be unexamined immediately, except in instances where gender identity or sexual orientation may prove to be of concern to the patient or when in self-examination the clinician finds it to be a concern for his or her self. Attending to how we inevitably fashion our clinical responses on the basis of our own idiosyncratic constructions of gender is essential and case material from class members will be used to illustrate our dilemmas in this regard.

The course will begin with a broad discussion of gender as it enters our consulting room. I will describe how I came to be interested in this topic as well as offer some clinical vignettes. Participants are asked to come prepared with questions about the impact of gender on clinical work and with their own descriptive vignettes.

Gemma Marangoni Ainslie is a psychologist psychoanalyst in private practice in Austin, Texas. She is an adjunct faculty member at the Houston-Galveston Psychoanalytic Institute, has served as President of the Section (III) of Women, Gender and Psychoanalysis, and is currently President of the Section (I) of Psychologist Psychoanalyst Pracitioners of Division 39 of the American Psychological Association. She was co-editor of Psychoanalytic Reflections on a Gender-Free Case: Into the Void (Routledge, 2005) and has presented at national and international meetings on multiple topics, including gender. Her research interests include transsexualism and the mother-daughter relationship at menarche.

Gemma Marangoni Ainslie is a psychologist psychoanalyst in private practice in Austin, Texas. She is an adjunct faculty member at the Houston-Galveston Psychoanalytic Institute, has served as President of the Section (III) of Women, Gender and Psychoanalysis, and is currently President of the Section (I) of Psychologist Psychoanalyst Pracitioners of Division 39 of the American Psychological Association. She was co-editor of Psychoanalytic Reflections on a Gender-free Case: Into the Void (Routledge, 2005) and has presented at national and international meetings on multiple topics, including gender. Her research interests include transsexualism and the mother- daughter relationship at menarche.

Ann-Louise Silver, MD

The Lives and Works of the US Pioneers in the Psychotherapy of the Psychoses

Mar 11-13, 2011: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP
Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Fridays@CCP

Lecture and discussion open to the public
Friday March 11, 2011
6:30 Registration and reception
7 – 9PM Lecture and discussion

Emphasizing contributions from the Washington area, beginning with the presentation for Fridays@CCP, this seminar talk include photographs and sound bites of the professional giants and photos of the places where they worked. It will trace the historical development of psychoanalytic interest in treating psychosis, from its earliest days, through the emergence of interpersonal psychotherapy, to its evolution into relational psychotherapy. The presentation aims to inspire participants to delve into the writings of these master clinicians who will then inevitably serve as quasi-supervisors of participants’ ongoing clinical work, challenging them to develop increasingly focused awareness of their minute-to-minute emotional responses to their patients/clients.

Ann-Louise S. Silver, was on the medical staff of the Chestnut Lodge Hospital from 1976 until it closed in 2001, where she served as its Director of Education. She currently serves on the faculties of the Washington Center for Psychoanalysis, the Washington School of Psychiatry, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Maryland. She organized the United States Chapter of the International Society for the Psychological treatments of the Schizophrenias and other Psychoses and served as its first president, from 1998 to 2008. She served for nine years on the international board of ISPS, the last three as its treasurer.

She is in the private practice of psychiatry and psychoanalysis, working since 1974 in an office in her home in Columbia, Maryland which you can visit at www.mdpsychotherapy.com and where you can read and comment on representative papers by her.

Readings
  1. Silver, Ann-Louise. (1993) “Countertransference, Ferenczi, and Washington, DC.” Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 21(4), 637-654

Neville Symington, PhD

The Source of Sanity and a Pattern of Madness

April 8-10, 2011: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP
Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Fridays@CCP

Friday April 8, 2011
6:30 Registration and reception
7 – 9PM Lecture and discussion
Lecture and discussion open to the public.

Dr Symington’s Fridays@CCP presentation will be “A Pattern of Madness: An Overview.” In that talk he will outline his theory of Madness. On Saturday and Sunday he will elaborate on the aspects of his theory, as presented Friday evening.

Neville Symington is a psycho-analyst in private practice with his wife (also a psycho-analyst) in Sydney, Australia. As a young man he took a diploma in Philosophy andthen in Theology. He later did a degree in Psychology and took a diploma in ClinicalPsychology. He did his psycho-analytic training in London and is a Fellow of the British Psycho-Analytical Society. He held a senior staff position in the Adult Department of theTavistock Clinic from 1977-85. He was also Chairman of the Psychology Discipline forthe Adult and Adolescent Departments at the Tavistock Clinic in London.. In 1986 he migrated to Sydney, Australia where he was Chairman of the Sydney Institute for Psycho-Analysis from 1987-93. He was President of the Australian Psycho-Analytic Society from 1999-2002.

He is the author of The Analytic Experience (Free Association Press and St. Martins Press); Emotion and Spirit (published by Cassell and later re-published by Karnac Books); Narcissism: A New Theory; The Making of a Psychotherapist; The Spirit of Sanity; A Pattern of Madness; How to Choose a Psychotherapist; The Blind Man Sees: Freud’s Awakening and Other Essays; A Healing Conversation: How Healing Happens; and Becoming a Person Through Psychoanalysis, all published by Karnac Books. He is joint-author with Joan Symington of The Clinical Thinking of Wilfred Bion(Routledge). He also published a novel called A Priest’s Affair (Free Association Press) and a book of poetry In-gratitude and Other Poems (Karnac). He has lectured in Britain, Norway, Denmark, Poland, Germany, the United States, Brazil, Israel, India, Japan, New Zealand and Australia. He has a website atwww.nevillesymington.com

Readings
  1. Symington, Neville, (2002) A Pattern of Madness (Karnac)
  2. Symington, Neville (1993) Narcissism: A New Theory

Jane Gallop, PhD

Gender, Sexuality, Psychoanalysis

May 13-15, 2011: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP
Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago
Fridays@CCP
Friday May 13, 2011
6:30 Registration and reception
7 – 9PM Lecture and discussion

Dr Gallopʼs seminar will offer an overview of Psychoanalysis and Feminism and how that strain of psychoanalytic thinking evolved into Psychoanalysis and Queer Theory, the site of current thought.

Jane Gallop is Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee. She has published a number of books at the intersection of poststructuralist feminist and psychoanalytic theory, including: The Daughter’s Seduction: Feminism and Psychoanalysis (1982), Reading Lacan (1985),Thinking Through the Body (1987), and Anecdotal Theory (2002). She has also published a pair of hybrid memoir/theory books reflecting on her work and home life: Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment (1997) and Living with His Camera(2003). Gallop is currently doing work in Queer Theory and has just completed a book on the queer temporality of writing, how the reader and the writer are haunted by the death of the author.

2009-2010

Johanna Tabin, PhD, ABPP

The Opening Phase of an Analysis

Sept 20, Oct 11, 25, Nov 15; Sundays 1-4pm

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Theodore Jacobs, MD

Countertransference and the Analyst’s Subjectivity

Oct 16-18, 2009: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP

Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Arnold Tobin, MD

Freud’s Papers

Dec 7, 2009, Jan 18, Feb 8 Mar 8, Apr 5 May 3, 2010: Mondays 7-9pm

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Frank Summers, PhD

Treating the Unanalyzable Patient with Analysis

Jan 22, 2010: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP

Fridays: Feb 5, 19 Mar 5, 19, Apr 2, 10am-12pm

McClurg Court, 333 E Ontario, Ste 4509B, Chicago

Marilyn Charles, PhD

“Dreaming, Fantasying, and Living”: Creativity and the Art of Psychoanalysis

Feb 26-28, 2010: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP

Sat 9-1, 2:30-4:30; Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Peter Shabad, PhD

Passions, Losses, and Shame: The Challenge of Mourning and Change

March 28, April 11, 2010: Sundays 9-1 and 2:30-4:30

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

Stefanie Glennon, PhD

Issues around Termination in Psychoanalysis and Mourning

May 7-9, 2010: Fri 7-9pm for Fridays@CCP

Sat 9-1; 2:30-4:30 Sun 9-1

The Chicago School, 325 N Wells, Chicago

2008-2009

Anna Aragno, PhD

The witch’s tale: Psychoanalytic method, methodology, models, and metapsychology; Let’s sort the whole thing out.

October 3-5, 2008

Revisioning Metapsychology: In today’s atheoretical psychoanalytic climate there is no longer any mention of, or interest in, metapsychology. Yet this aspect of psychoanalysis was deemed by Freud to be of the utmost importance, indeed the bedrock and potentially the explanatory foundation for our field. Rather than coming together for rigorous interdisciplinary and epistemological discussion, the field has continued to move on by dissention and division, so that while there are now 12 or so different psychoanalytic “schools,” all practicing a “talking” clinical method, there are no consensually agreed upon, or metatheoretical principles, that explain how dialogues work or how “talking” cures.

The overall purpose of this seminar is to identify and discuss the implications of our field’s ignoring the need to update, revise and integrate our metapsychology, and to propose new, explanatory foundations within a unified system of ideas from a semiotic and discourse conceptual framework.

Born in Rome, Italy, Anna Aragno first trained and performed as a prima ballerina, winning international acclaim at age 13 for her performance in Giselle, and later, inRaymonda. At 18 she danced solo parts with the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow; one year later, she won a Fulbright Scholarship to the US, where she gained principal ballerina status with the New York’s Metropolitan Opera Ballet.

In her second professional life, Dr Anna Aragno, is a psychoanalyst in private practice in New York and affiliated with the Postgraduate Center for Mental Health and the Washington Square Institute. She is an alumna of the New School and the author of two books: Symbolization; Proposing a Developmental Paradigm for a New Psychoanalytic Model of Mind (1997) and Forms of Knowledge (2008, in press).

Anna Ornstein, MD and Paul Ornstein, MD

Self-psychology: Clinical consequences of a theoretical framework

November 7-9, 2008

Together, Anna and Paul Ornstein, were pioneers –with Heinz Kohut– in the evolution of the theory of self-psychology. As a result of their long-term collaboration, they have co-authored countless articles and presentations and have presented self-psychology to national and international audiences. Their ongoing interest in self-psychology continues to involve the treatment process.

Anna Ornstein, MD, is Professor Emerita of Child Psychiatry, the University of Cincinnati; Co-Director, International Center for the Study of Psychoanalytic Self-Psychology; and Lecturer in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Ornstein received her medical degree in Heidelberg, Germany. She completed her psychiatric and child psychiatric training at the University of Cincinnati and is a graduate of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. Dr Ornstein is a Training and Supervising Analyst at the Cincinnati Psychoanalytic Institute and a Supervising Analyst at the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute. Dr Ornstein’s extensive publications include articles on the interpretive process in psychoanalysis, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, child psychopathology, the treatment of children and families, and the process of recovery following the survival of extreme conditions. Dr Ornstein is the recipient of several awards and honors, including the Distinguished Psychiatrist Lecturer Award (American Psychiatric Association, 1989), the Rosenberry Award for Dedication to the care of children (1991), the University of Cincinnati Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship (1996), and Special Presidential Commendation (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Anna Ornstein’s book, My Mother’s Eyes: Holocaust Memories of a Young Girl, (2004) retells her family stories and describes her experience and survival of Auschwitz.

Paul H. Ornstein, MD received his medical degree in Heidelberg, Germany and his psychiatric training at the University of Cincinnati. He is Professor of Psychiatry [Emeritus] and Professor of Psychoanalysis [Emeritus] at the University of Cincinnati. He is Co-Director of the International Center for the Study of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology. He is a graduate of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis and is a Training and Supervising Analyst at the Cincinnati Psychoanalytic Institute and Supervising Analyst at the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute. He is currently Lecturer in Psychiatry at Harvard University Medical School (Massachusetts Mental Health Center) and is a faculty member of the Psychoanalytic Institute New England East and of the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute. Since 1999, he serves as chair of the Training Committee for the Tel Aviv Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis. Dr Ornstein is a former member of the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Psychological Association and Psychoanalytic Inquiry.

Dr. Ornstein has written on psychoanalytic psychotherapy and the interpretive process in psychoanalysis (many of these were jointly written with his wife Anna and on the topic of self psychology). He has co-authored a book with Michael Balint on Focal Psychotherapy and edited and introduced the collection of Heinz Kohut’s Selected Writings: The Search for the Self, Volumes I-IV. Dr. Ornstein has nearly one hundred and twenty scientific publications to his credit. Both alone and with his wife, he has conducted more than three-hundred seminars and workshops in most major training centers in the United States and some abroad, including Argentina, Austria, Australia, Canada, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Holland, Israel, Italy, Indonesia (Bali & Yogyakarta) Norway, Peru, Spain, Sweden Switzerland and Turkey.

Stuart Twemlow, MD; Marie Rudden, MD; and others.

Community Psychoanalysis

In collaboration with ICSW, Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis, and Chicago Psychoanalytic Society

December 5-7, 2008

We are planning a weekend-long course (with perhaps some video-conferencing follow-up afterwards) on Community Psychoanalysis to be taught by Stuart Twemlow, Marie Rudden and others. This will be a joint project of the Institute for Clinical Social Work, the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis, the Institute for Psychoanalysis, and the Chicago Psychoanalytic Society. The idea behind this is to become more thoroughly knowledgeable about the very interesting applications of psychoanalytic thought to community and social issues, and the kinds of interventions that are possible in settings outside of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, which Stuart Twenlow and his colleagues have been developing over the years.

The course would begin with a Friday night public lecture by Stuart Twemlow on the topic of violence in schools and society, the bully-bystander dynamic, and application of psychoanalytic understanding to intervention in these situations. This will be followed by a seminar style course on Saturday and Sunday, presumably about 10 hours altogether over those two days. Marie Rudden will discuss psychoanalytic theory about group regression, leadership, and applications to community work. She and/or Stuart Twemlow will discuss Vamik Volkan’s contributions to theory of large group intervention and international projects. Other subject areas will be covered, such as Gilda Sherwin on intergenerational transmission of trauma, using her experience with second generation Holocaust survivors and with torture victims seeking asylum., and Jeffrey Taxman on post 9/11 and post tsunami interventions. Finally, Stuart Twemlow and Marie Rudden will discuss prejudice and a framework for interventions in racial or class divided situations.

Nancy McWilliams, PhD

Psychoanalytic Understanding of Psychodiagnosis

February 6-8, 2009

Dr McWilliams ideas, to be presented and discussed in this seminar, will be invaluable for recognizing patterns that have therapeutic implications.

Nancy McWilliams, who teaches at the Graduate School of Applied & Professional Psychology at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, is author ofPsychoanalytic Diagnosis: Understanding Personality Structure in the Clinical Process (1994), Psychoanalytic Case Formulation (1999), and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: A Practitioner’s Guide (2004), and is Associate Editor of the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (2006). She is President of the Division of sPsychoanalysis (39) of the American Psychological Association, Associate Editor of the Psychoanalytic Review, and on the editorial board of Psychoanalytic Psychology.

Dr. McWilliams has written widely on personality structure and personality disorders, psychodiagnosis, sex and gender, trauma, intensive psychotherapy, and contemporary challenges to the humanistic tradition in psychotherapy. Her books have been translated into twelve languages, and she has lectured widely both nationally and internationally. Her book on case formulation received the Gradiva Award for best psychoanalytic clinical book of 1999; in 2004 she was given the Rosalee Weiss Award for contributions to practice by the Division of Independent Practitioners of the American Psychological Association; and in 2006 she was made an Honorary Member of the American Psychoanalytic Association. A graduate of the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis, she is also affiliated with the Institute for Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy of New Jersey and the National Training Program of the National Institute for the Psychotherapies in New York City. She has a private practice in Flemington, New Jersey.

Danielle Bergeron, MD

Psychosis à la Lacan

February 20-22, 2009

This seminar will be of interest to participants for its combined focus on Lacanian psychoanalysis as well as possibilities for the treatment of psychosis today.

Danielle Bergeron, MD, is a training analyst and associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Laval, Canada, and a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. She has numerous publications, including Traiter la Psychose (1990), which she co-authored with Willy Apollon and Lucie Cantin and After Lacan: Clinical Practice and the Subject of the Unconscious (2002). Her writing covers topics ranging from the treatment of psychosis and neurosis to femininity, art and aesthetics.

Dr. Bergeron is the director of the “388,” the Psychoanalytic Treatment Center for Young Psychotic Adults, is in charge of the short-term analytic therapy service at Robert-Giffard hospital, and serves as coordinator of education and training for the Center for Training, Research and Cooperation of GIFRIC , as well as coordinator for the GIFRIC’S Clinical Council.

Paul Lippmann, PhD

Nocturnes: On listening to Dreams

March 20-22, 2009

Dr Lippmann’s book, Nocturnes: On Listening to Dreams, takes the reader on a poetic journey of dreams, dream interpretation, and the influence and use of dreams in human history. Beginning with the powerful authority given to dreams in ancient civilizations and continuing to the intimate and inseparable relationship between dreams and Freud’s psychoanalysis, Dr Lippmann takes us to the decline in the significance of the dream in modern life and current psychoanalysis. Yet, he reminds us that dreams still serve as a powerful source of information about the creativity of the unconscious mind, and that “dreams and therapy go together” as they find their way to the secrets of the soul.

Dr Paul Lippmann is a Fellow, Faculty, Training and Supervising Analyst, WAWI; and member of the faculty at the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. He serves as director of the Stockbridge Dream Society and is the author of Nocturnes:: On Listening to Dreams.

Samuel Gerson, PhD

The Play of the Unconscious

May 15-17, 2009

Theater has always provided us with incisive portrayals of lives propelled by unconscious conflict and the intergenerational transmission of trauma. Among the classics of contemporary drama are plays that center on the enduring impact of a dead child on the life of the family. In this seminar, we will consider Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey into Night, Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolff, and Martin McDonagh’s The Pillowman as texts that yield rich insights into the unconscious personal, familial, and cultural forces that inform our own daily clinical work. These literary texts will be coupled with readings of current relational perspectives on the unconscious and thirdness, with the aim of elucidating how ghosts of the past are embedded in unconscious phantasy and maintained and enacted through the relational unconscious that informs clinical process.

Sam Gerson, PhD is a founder and Past-President of both the Northern California Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology and the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California (PINC) where he is currently on the faculty and is a Personal and Supervising Analyst. Dr. Gerson, a Professor at the California School of Professional Psychology, is an Associate Editor of Psychoanalytic Dialogues, and is an Editor for Studies in Gender and Sexuality and the Psychoanalytic Quarterly. Prior to moving to San Francisco he was on the faculty of Harvard Medical School and Director of Out-Patient Mental Health Services at the Cambridge Hospital. He has written extensively on intersubjective aspects of unconscious life including “Unconscious Phantasy and Relational Reality” in Psychoanalytic Inquiry (2008) and “The Relational Unconscious” in Psychoanalytic Quarterly (2004). He received the Elise M. Hayman Award for the Study of Genocide and the Holocaust from the International Psychoanalytic Association (Berlin, 2007) for his paper entitled “When the Third is Dead: Memory, Mourning and Witnessing in the Aftermath of the Holocaust.”

2007-2008 Courses

Gila Ofer, PhD

Love and Hate in Psychoanalysis

October 19-21 2007

Patrick Kavanaugh PhD.

Psychoanalysis and Medication: Clinical Implications

February 22-24, 2008

Lewis Aron, PhD.

Relational Psychoanalysis

March 7-9, 2008

Suzanne Gassner, PhD.

Unconscious Scripts: Control Mastery Theory

April 2008

Robert Waska, PhD.

The Danger of Change: The Kleinian Approach with Patients who Experience Progress as Trauma

May 9-11, 2008

Arnold Tobin, MD and Eva Lichtenberg, PhD

Psychoanalysis and Literature: How Literature Illuminates Psychoanalysis

Michael Hoit, MD

Clinical Case Seminar

2006-2007 Courses

James Grotstein, MD

Bion

October 6-8, 2006

James Grotstein, MD
Training and Supervising Analyst, Los Angeles Psychoanalytic Institute and Psychoanalytic Center of California. Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA. Past North American President, International Psychoanalytic Association.Dr. Grotstein is an internationally renowned psychoanalyst and the author of seven books and hundreds of articles on psychoanalysis and Bion, including: Do I Dare Disturb the Universe: A Memorial to Wilfred Bion (ed.), and Fairbairn and the Origin of Object Relations (ed.), Splitting and Projective Identification, Who is the Dreamer Who Dreams the Dream: A Study in Psychic Presences, and But at the Same Time and On a Another Level – Psychoanalytic Technique in the Kleinian/NeoKleinian/Bionian Mode: A Beginning.

Johanna Tabin, PhD

The Trajectory of Early Development and Severe Psychopathology

November 7 and December 3, 2006

Johanna Tabin, PhD
Johanna Krout Tabin, PhD, ABPP is a founding member of CCP. In over one hundred publications and professional presentations, her interests have ranged from critiques of psychotherapeutic processes to universal symbolism. As in her book, On the Way to Self: Ego and Early Oedipal Development, a special interest of hers has been and remains the relationship between ego formation and subsequent behavior. She received Lifetime Achievement awards from both Division 39, Section I (psychoanalytic practitioners) and Section III (women’s issues). Dr. Tabin recommends that the best preparation for her seminar will be to observe children as much as possible during the period when their egos first coalesce, which is from approximately fifteen months to two and a half years of age.

Ghislaine Boulanger, PhD

Trauma and Psychoanalysis

March 10-12, 2007

Ghislaine Boulanger, PhD: Member, teaching faculty, Clinical Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. When Dr. Boulanger was obtaining her PhD in the late seventies, she joined a congressionally mandated research team to do an epidemiological study of Vietnam veterans. She was particularly interested in what had caused the psychological breakdown of so many Vietnam veterans upon their return home. Consistent with her psychodynamic training, she was sure that she would find predisposing factors leading men (there were no women in the study) to breakdown. She was wrong, and found that at the most intense levels of combat, predisposition played no role in determining who would become dysfunctional. Wondering about these findings set her on a course that led to a career of writing and teaching about the psychodynamic causes and consequences of adult trauma – a topic that went largely unrecognized by psychoanalysts until 9/11/2001.

Marion Tolpin

Self Psychology

April 14-16, 2007

Kerry and Jack Novick, PhD

May 18-20, 2007

Kerry Kelly Novick and Jack Novick, PhD:
Faculty, Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute.
Faculty, Michigan Psychoanalytic Council.Kerry Kelly Novick and Jack Novick are child, adolescent and adult psychoanalysts. They trained with Anna Freud in London and have been working with children and families for 35 years. They are active in teaching, research, and their community, and joined other colleagues to found a non-profit psychoanalytic school, Allen Creek Preschool, in Ann Arbor. Both Jack and Kerry Novick have written extensively, with many articles published in major professional journals, on topics of defense, termination, development, verbalization, sadomasochism, the therapeutic alliance, and omnipotence. Their first book, Fearful Symmetry: the Development and Treatment of Sadomasochism, appeared in 1996, followed by Working with Parents Makes Therapy Work, in 2005.

Arnold Tobin, MD

Freud’s Papers

Mondays: 9/25, 10/16, 11/13,1 2/4, 1/8/07, 2/05/07

Arnold Tobin, MD
Faculty, Institute for Psychoanalysis.
Training and Supervising Analyst, Institute for Psychoanalysis.Arnold Tobin, MD, was born and raised in Chicago, and also received his training here. He had a psychiatric residence at P&PI, Michael Reese Hospital, under Roy Grinker, MD, and also completed his psychoanalytic training here, at the Institute for Psychoanalysis. He has taught several courses, currently on Freudian theory and practice, and previously on dreams and on Freud’s case histories. Dr. Tobin became aware of the complexities of PTSD while in the US Navy, where he ran the Admissions Ward for Marines who broke down during combat. He since was involved in a number of forensic PTSD cases, including the first case in which PTSD was used successfully as a defense.

Henry Evans, MD

Case Conference

Henry Evans, MD: Faculty, Institute for Psychoanalysis.
Member, Governing Council, Institute for Psychoanalysis.
Secretary of the Board and Instructor of the Second Year Theory of Technique course in the Core Curriculum of the Psychoanalytic Training Program.
Training and Supervising Analyst, Institute for Psychoanalysis.
Chair, Training Analyst Committee, Institute for Psychoanalysis.
Chair and the Founder, Local Fellowship Program, Institute for Psychoanalysis. Founding member and Principal, Analytic Consultants, Ltd., a consulting firm offering analytically informed consultation to businesses and professional organizations and individuals.
Member, American Psychoanalytic Association, Committee On Institutes.
Editorial Board, Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. Dr. Evans’ theoretical interests are eclectic, including object relations theory, self psychology, some aspects of conflict theory, attachment concepts, and the interface between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

2005-2006 Courses

Paul Roazen, PhD

The History of Politics and Psychoanalysis After Freud

Paul Roazen, PhD
Professor emeritus of Social and Political Science at York University and a Harvard University Academician. Dr.Roazen is an authority on the history of psychoanalysis and on political psychology. He was, educated as a political theorist at Harvard, Chicago, and Oxford, has spent his career approaching psychoanalysis as an aspect of intellectual history. Issues of a moral and philosophic nature remain central to the tradition of thought that Freud initiated, and help account for the unfortunate sectarianism that has afflicted the field. Dr. Roazen is the author of seminal books and articles in the history of psychoanalysis. “On the Freud Watch: Public Memoirs”opens and closes with autobiographical pieces, but the book as a whole reflects an intensely personal account of how Roazen became known as a “controversial” figure within psychoanalysis. His impressive bibliography also includes such classics asFreud: Political and Social Thought; Brother Animal: The Story of Freud and Tausk; Freud and His Followers; Erik H. Erikson: The Power and Limits of a Vision; andHelene Deutsch: A Psychoanalyst’s Life.

Bruce Fink, PhD

Lacan

Bruce Fink, PhD:
Psychoanalyst and Professor of Psychology is a practicing Lacanian psychoanalyst, analytic supervisor, and professor of psychology at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. He obtained his PhD in Psychoanalysis from the University of Paris and his clinical training at l’Ecole de la Cause freudienne, also in Paris. Dr. Fink is the author of two books, A Clinical Introduction to Lacanian Psychoanalysis (Harvard Press, 1997) and The
Lacanian Subject: Between Knowledge and Jouissance (Princeton Press, 1995). He has also edited two collections of essays and written numerous other essays. He has translated several books of Lacan: Seminar XX: On Feminine Sexuality: The Limits of Love and Knowledge (Norton, 1998) and the revised Ecrits: A Selection (Norton, 2002). He is currently preparing a translation of the complete Ecrits and Seminar VIII, On the Transference.

Marilyn Charles, PhD

Non-Verbal Communication

Marilyn Charles, PhD:
Psychologist and psychoanalyst in practice in East Lansing, Michigan, who works extensively with artists, writers, and musicians. A poet and an artist, herself, Dr. Charles has had a special interest in the creative process and in facilitating creativity in patients and in clinicians. As a Training and Supervising Analyst with the Michigan Psychoanalytic Council and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Psychology at Michigan State
University, she is committed to mentoring the next generation of clinicians, for whom issues of creativity and generativity are of particular importance. Dr. Charles has presented her work widely and has published extensively in psychoanalytic journals. She is the author of Patterns: Building Blocks of Experience (2002) and Learning From Experience: A Clinician’s Guide (2004), both published by the Analytic Press, and
Constructing Realities: Transformations in Myth and Metaphor, forthcoming from Rodopi.

Herbert Schlesinger, PhD

Resistance, Defense, Regression

Leon Wurmser, MD

Affect in Psychoanalysis

Leon Wurmser, MD:
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of West Virginia, and training and supervising analyst of the New York Freudian Society. Dr. Wurmser was formerly Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program at the University of Maryland. He continues to teach here and in several European countries. His other honors include the Lewis B. Hill Award of the Baltimore-D.C. Institute for psychoanalysis, an award from the American Mental Health Foundation, and honorary membership in the Czech Psychoanalytic Society. His publications include The Mask of Shame and The Hidden Dimension, along with some 300 scientific articles.

Bertram Cohler, PhD

Freud’s Papers

Bert Cohler, PhD:
William Rainey Harper Professor of Social Sciences in the College, and Professor, Departments of Psychology, Education, and Psychiatry, the University of Chicago. Dr. Cohler is a graduate of the Institute for Psychoanalysis in Chicago. He received an A.B. in Human Development from the Univesity of Chicago in 1961 and a PhD from Harvard in 1967. He returned to Chicago in 1969 to become Director of the Orthogenic School. His interests presently include life-story and response to adversity and stigma. Dr. Cohler studies lives over time and within context, using both narrative and counted data perspectives; developmental psychopathology and family process, family and personality development, aging, self and family. (Human Development, Developmental Psychology, Mental Health). He is the author of many publications and has received two Quantrell awards for undergraduate teaching excellence at the University of Chicago.

Henry Evans, MD

Case Conference

Henry Evans, MD:
Faculty of the Institute for Psychoanalysis, member of the governing Council, Secretary of the Board and Instructor of the Second Year Theory of Technique course in the Core Curriculum of the psychoanalytic training program. Training and Supervising Analyst and Chair of the Training Analyst Committee. Chair and and the founder of the Local Fellowship Program at the Institute. Founding member and Principal of Analytic Consultants, Ltd., a consulting firm offering analytically informed consultation to businesses and professional organizations and individuals. Member of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Committee On Institutes, serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. Theoretical interests are eclectic, including object relations theory, self psychology, some aspects of conflict theory, attachment concepts and interest in the interface between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

2004-2005 Courses

Arnold Tobin, MD

Continuing Case Conference

Christopher Bollas, PhD

Hysteria

Lawrence Friedman, PhD

Psychoanalytic Technique II

Kerry Novick and Jack Novick, PhD

Reclaiming the Land – Integrating Developmental Theories with the Psychoanalysis of Adults

Bertram Cohler, PhD

Freud’s Papers

Arnold Tobin, MD

Continuing Case Conference

Frank Summers, PhD

Clinical Seminar based on Object Relations Theories

The prerequisite for participation is a theoretical knowledge of Object Relations Theories

Martin Bergmann, PhD

Love and Termination

2003-2004 Courses

Leo Rangell, MD

The Human Core: The Intrapsychic Base of Behavior

Christopher Bollas, PhD

Frank Summers, PhD

Theories of Object Relations

Salman Akhtar, MD

Self-hate and the Hate of Others

Irwin Hoffman, PhD

Dialectical Reconstructivism

Frank Lachmann PhD

Implications of Infant Research for Psychoanalysis

Judith Vida, PhD

Introduction to the Life and Work of Sandor Ferenczi

Lawrence Friedman, MD

Psychoanalytic Technique I

Dale Boesky, MD

The Methodology of Psychoanalytic Evidence

Jerry Vogel, MD

Hans W. Loewald